Former Corn Board director helps Ukrainian refugees in Poland

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A former agricultural leader from Nebraska urges American farmers to help their Ukrainian counterparts. Don Hutchens knows growers here face many challenges with higher costs and drought issues. what the producers in Ukraine are going through. “How difficult it would be to have your grain silos bombed. Your export terminals blocked, your machinery stolen, your fields bombed or mined and then maybe having to get off a tractor and go fight for your country,” said Hutchens said. Hutchens recently spent two weeks in Poland. He volunteered for Operation Safe Harbor Ukraine. from the eastern part of Ukraine that was really under attack,” Hutchens said. The 73-year-old would help run daily errands and deliver meals. But most of the time he spent time and played with the 75 to 90 children in the hotel. “Obviously they missed their fathers, their grandfathers or their brothers, their uncles who stayed in Ukraine to defend their country,” Hutchens said. There, Hutchens also reflected on how commodity prices have risen in the United States in part because of the war in Ukraine. in the face of a crisis or tragedy – help a neighbor even if they are thousands of miles away and a global competitor. “They’re farmers. They put their boots on like us,” Hutchens said. “We’re always here to help out a neighbor in times of need,” the Hutchens mentioned. He also keeps a candy bar given to him as a bittersweet goodbye from a little boy who begged him. not to leave. Hutchens said the best way to help refugees is to donate money to trusted organizations. He also encouraged people to donate to Operation Safe Harbor-Ukraine. so far, OSHU has been able to help more than 200 Ukrainian families.

A former agricultural leader from Nebraska urges American farmers to help their Ukrainian counterparts.

Don Hutchens knows growers here face many challenges with higher costs and drought issues.

But the retired Nebraska Corn Board director and former director of the Nebraska Department of Agriculture said that’s nothing like what Ukrainian growers are going through.

“How difficult it would be to have your grain silos bombed. Your export terminals blocked, your machinery stolen, your fields bombed or mined and then maybe having to get off a tractor and go fight for your country,” he said. Hutchens said.

Hutchens recently spent two weeks in Poland.

He volunteered for Operation Safe Harbor Ukraine.

It’s an effort by Lincoln’s travel agent, Steve Glenn, to take any donation he receives and book 60 hotel rooms in Warsaw to house refugees.

“They were coming from the eastern part of Ukraine which was really under attack,” Hutchens said.

The 73-year-old would help run daily supply errands and deliver meals. But most of the time he spent time and played with the 75 to 90 children in the hotel.

“Obviously they missed their fathers, their grandfathers or their brothers, their uncles who stayed in Ukraine to defend their country,” Hutchens said.

While there, Hutchens also explained how commodity prices have risen in the United States, in part due to the war in Ukraine.

“Their loss kind of became our gain,” Hutchens said.

Now he is trying to encourage farmers back home to do what they have always faced in the face of crisis or tragedy: help a neighbor even if he is thousands of miles away and a global competitor.

“They’re farmers. They put their boots on like we do,” Hutchens said.

“We’re always here to help a neighbor in times of need,” Hutchens said.

Hutchens wears a bracelet made by a Ukrainian child as a reminder

“Without a word, she just put it on my wrist and I haven’t taken it off since,” Hutchens said.

He also keeps a candy bar given to him as a bittersweet farewell from a little boy who begged him not to leave.

“And he just took this candy bar and he put it on my leg and told me to go home,” Hutchens said.

Hutchens said the best way to help refugees is to donate money to trusted organisations.

He also encouraged people to donate to Operation Safe Harbor-Ukraine.

So far, OSHU has been able to help more than 200 Ukrainian families.

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